Current Home Run Leader Dan Uggla Relies On Top Hitting Performance Of Supreme Protein® Bars

When most of us reach for a performance bar, we’re hoping it will help us get through the next part of the day or workout session. But if you’re currently leading the major leagues in home runs, like premier second baseman Dan Uggla, you need the best nutrients possible to push you through the next crucial inning or game. That’s why Dan depends on the delicious and nutrient-dense Supreme Protein® bars.

“I eat two Supreme Protein® bars a day,” the consistent-hitting second baseman says. “The flavor is unbelievable and each one has all the ingredients to deliver the nutritional profile I need to perform at a high level.”

The key to this superior nutritional profile is 30 grams of premium protein, powered by top-quality whey protein isolate (WPI). This WPI is the gold standard of all protein available today with an amino-acid density unlike any other food source. In fact, the biological value (a measurement of how completely a protein is used) of this whey isolate is much higher than beef, chicken, fish or eggs. This makes it a quicker and more superior lean mass-building agent than anything available and can be easily incorporated into a workout routine to provide optimum recovery and energy support. This is a critical fact that many major athletes like Dan depend on for gaining the advantage.

“During the baseball season, it is important for me to maintain lean body mass and weight so that I can maintain my strength throughout the course of the season,” Dan says. “Supreme Protein® bars allow me to get the protein and nutrients that I need so that I can recover from my workouts faster and exercise longer before feeling signs of fatigue. I’ve definitely noticed a difference since I’ve added Supreme Protein® bars to my routine.”

Incorporating Supreme Protein® into his training methods seems to have paid off as Dan is well-established as one of the elite new major league players, third in 2007 Rookie of the Year voting with a current stat line (mid June) of a Major-League leading 23 HR, plus 50 RBIs and a .281 Batting Average. The match-up with Supreme bars, according to Dan, was one of relative perfection. Less than a year ago, he discovered these amazing bars and developed an affinity, recognizing the same commitment to excellence in the bar recipe that he shows for his career.

This relationship is a natural for me,” he says. “I aspire to be the best player I can be, and the best player among my peers. That’s something Supreme Protein® has already achieved. Supreme Protein® is easily the category leader in both taste and quality.”

And Supreme Protein® bars have achieved this lead in part by offering a premium protein blend featuring high amounts of whey protein isolate to help support lean muscle mass. But this is only part of the story. These incredibly delicious bars deliver a quadruple layer taste sensation like no other bar on the market today, making Supreme Protein® worthy enough to befit the current home-run king.

From his rookie start in 2006, to his well-deserved 2nd base spot at next month’s 2008 All Star Game at Yankee Stadium, this high profile Florida Marlin’s favorite has shown a steady consistency in his performance along with extraordinary offensive firepower. This power-hitting phenomenon credits the power-packed Supreme bars for providing the kind of vital lean mass-building nutrition for the single most awe-inspiring stat in baseball, home run king!

You may not be a top professional athlete like Dan Uggla, but it’s good to know that the same nutritional masterpiece that helped carry this champion to high ranks in the majors is also available for your everyday workouts. Putting Supreme Protein® in your lineup is a winning move!

Overrated

article 2008 overated 02 Overrated“How much do ya bench?” It’s arguably the most oft-asked question of bodybuilders and gym rats, and we’re here to tell you, the answer doesn’t matter all that much. In fact, concentrating too hard on the bench press to inflate your max to impressive proportions is counterproductive. The same is true of less celebrated but no-less-common exercises you may rely on workout after workout.

Blasphemy, you say? Read on, and see if we can’t change your mind – and improve your results.

Chest: Barbell Bench Press
We don’t lead off this list with the ever-popular bench press because it’s a lousy exercise. It’s not. However, it’s here because far too many people attribute way too much importance to it, performing it to the detriment of their overall chest development. Too much emphasis on the barbell press leads to thick meaty muscle in your middle chest, while the larger upper-pectoral area lags woefully behind.

Best alternative: To attack the most important area of your chest, Dumbbell and Barbell Incline Presses can’t be beat. Both also hit your middle chest (much more effectively than the flat-bench press hits the upper pecs), making them a solid anchor in any chest-training workout.

Back: Supported T-Bar Row
The T-bar row is a wonderful exercise, directly engaging the muscles of your mid- and upper back. However, a certain variation of the T-bar row includes a pad that you rest your chest on during the exercise. Bad idea – the heavier you lift, the more the weight compresses your chest (and lungs) against the pad as you lift. It’s a lot harder to maintain good form and continue a set to the point of failure when you’re struggling for a deep breath.

Best alternative: Thankfully, equipment manufacturers make a freestanding version of the T-Bar Row, without the pad, allowing you to breathe easy during your sets. You can also do T-bar rows the old-fashioned way, placing one end of an Olympic barbell in the corner and loading the other end. Just straddle the bar and get into position, and you can perform either one-arm or two-arm rows.

Shoulders: Reverse Pec-Deck Flye
The problem with the reverse pec-deck flye is that it’s a poor replacement for the more valuable bent-over dumbbell lateral raise. Try a set of reverse pec decks and you’ll see what we mean – not only are they relatively easy because of the mechanical advantage (due to the design of the machine and the fact you’re upright and not working directly against gravity), but most people find it difficult to focus the effort on their rear delts no matter how well they perform each rep.

Best alternative: Many people do struggle with their form on bent-over dumbbell lateral raises, mainly because they try to lift too much – think about how small the target muscles actually are, and you’ll soon realize that hoisting 50s is calling on more momentum and back muscles than the rear delts. Lighten the load, take each rep slowly and deliberately, and focus on contracting your rear delts on each rep, and you’ll get much better results from this exercise than even pec-deck flyes done with perfect form.

Legs: Leg Press
There’s a reason scrawny-legged guys can press hundreds of pounds on the leg press, but can barely eke out reps with 185 pounds on the barbell squat: The leg press has too much mechanical advantage inherent in its design. Impressive tree-trunk thighs are not forged on a steady diet of leg presses – to really get at the tough muscle fibers of the quadriceps, hamstrings and glutes, you need to challenge them fiercely, and the leg press doesn’t do that. It’s just too easy in comparison to other superior movements.

Best alternative: The barbell squat and hack squat are a much truer test of mettle for your thighs and glutes – in these two exercises, you’re not at a mechanical advantage, putting your muscles under maximal stress, which is the quickest way to muscle-building results.

Triceps: Dumbbell Kickback
Of all the excellent triceps exercises available to you – close-grip bench presses, dips, lying French presses, two-arm overhead extensions, cable pressdowns, among many others – why would you ever want to cycle in a less-effective move like kickbacks? People commonly bring the weight too far forward at the start of the repetition, taking stress off the triceps and generating momentum to lift the weight back up to an arms-straight position. If you eliminate this issue and stop the weight before your elbow gets to 90 degrees, you are working in a compromised range of motion.

Best alternative: Any of the aforementioned exercises would be better, but one that mimics the kickback closely is the One-Arm Overhead Dumbbell Extension. The bonus? You use gravity to your advantage, eliminating the growth-robbing momentum and the “dead zone” where the stress is taken off the triceps.

article 2008 overated 01 OverratedBiceps: Standing Barbell Curl
Although the preacher curl machine, with its one-size-does-not-fit-all handles and awkward range of motion, could easily get the nod here, the standing barbell curl has hurt the productivity of many more biceps routines over the years. Like the bench press, this exercise isn’t overrated because it’s a bad exercise – it’s on this list because many guys not only put way too much emphasis on it in their workouts, but insist on letting their ego dictate how much weight they pile on the bar. From there, it’s all about hip thrust and body contortion to swing the weight to the top.

Best alternative: The Incline Dumbbell Curl puts your biceps on stretch for a more forceful and complete contraction, and being on a bench takes away the opportunity to use excess body movement to generate momentum on the lift.

Home Remodeling

Ready to get back to the basics of growing? Here’s a simple workout regimen that only requires an adjustable bench, barbell and plates, perfect for home or the gym.

On a quick lap around the typical health club, you’ll likely pass a lot of shiny, complicated equipment – cables that adjust to every conceivable angle, multifunctional apparatus with space age levers and handles, and stations for each and every muscle group. Impressive, maybe, but here’s the truth: You don’t need any of it to build a great physique.

This program (which can be done at home or that aforementioned club) centers around the bare-bones basics you need to craft a strong, muscular body. If you’re just starting out and want to keep your cash outlay to a minimum, here’s the good news: All that’s required is an adjustable bench, a barbell with a set of locking safety collars, and a selection of weight plates. That’s it – no high-tech machines necessary.

With the major body parts broken over a four-day split, you can either train four days per week, resting the other three, or get more aggressive, starting over at workout #1 before the week’s up and only taking one or two rest days per seven. Below, we break down the four training days for you, and offer instruction on the more esoteric exercises.

Day #1: Chest & Back
Body Part Exercise Sets Reps
Back Bent-Over Row
T-Bar Row
Good Morning
5
4
3
15, 10, 10, 8, 6
10, 10, 10, 8
20, 20, 20
Traps Barbell Shrug 4 12, 12, 10, 10
Chest Incline Bench Press*
Flat-Bench Press*
Wide-Grip Push-Up
Decline Bench Press*
5
4
3
3
15, 10, 10, 8, 6
10, 8, 8, 6
15, 15, 15
12, 10, 8
* On all benching exercises, have a spotter on hand at all times. In addition, consider not using collars if you’re at home, as you can dump the weights off of the barbell in an emergency.

Good Morning: Clean a moderately light barbell up from the floor and over your head so it rests across your shoulders, as if you were about to squat. Keeping your lumbar region tight and in its natural curve, bend at the hips to lower your upper body to a point where it forms a 90-degree angle with your legs (or as close as you can without rounding your lower back), then return to a standing position. Avoid the tendency to look up – your head should remain in line with your spine at all times.

Wide-Grip Push-Up: This is the same as a standard push-up, except place your hands outside of shoulder width, your elbows out and away from your body.

Day #2: Legs
Body Part Exercise Sets Reps
Thighs Hack Squat
Deadlift
Walking Lunge
5
5
5
15, 12, 10, 10, 8
12, 10, 8, 8, 6
10, 10, 10, 10, 10
Hamstringss Romanian Deadlift 4 12, 10, 10, 10
Calves Standing Raise
Seated Raise
3
3
20, 15, 15
20, 15, 15

Hack Squat: Place a loaded barbell on the floor behind your ankles. Bend at your knees and hips to lower yourself, grasp the barbell with an overhand or mixed grip, and drive through your heels, engaging your thighs to get to a standing position. Then lower the bar to the floor and repeat. Your back should be tight and straight throughout the exercise.

Walking Lunge: Standing upright, hold a plate in each hand, or clean a loaded barbell up and over your head to your upper back. Step forward with your left foot and descend into a lunge – at the bottom, your left knee will be at a 90-degree angle, your right leg will be straight and out behind you. Now extend your front knee and come back to a standing position before stepping forward with your right leg. One step with each leg equals one rep.

Standing and Seated Calf Raise: For standing raises, grasp a barbell and hold it at your thighs as you step onto a raised object such as a block, your heels hanging off the edge. For the seated version, place the block next to the bench and put a loaded barbell across your lap (or you can place weight plates on your lap) for resistance.

Day #3: Shoulders & Abs
Body Part Exercise Sets Reps
Shoulders Upright Row
Standing Press
Front Raise
Lateral Raise*
Bent-Over Raise*
4
4
3
3
3
15, 12, 10, 10
12, 10, 10, 8
12, 12, 10
12, 12, 10
12, 12, 10
Abs Crunch
Reverse Crunch
Side Bridge Plank
3
3
3
30, 30, 30
20, 20, 20
Hold for 30-60 seconds
* Hold weight plates for resistance.
Day #4: Arms
Body Part Exercise Sets Reps
Back Close-Grip Bench Press*
Lying Triceps Extension
Close-Grip Push-Up
4
4
3
15, 12, 10, 10
12, 10, 10, 8
15, 15, 15
Traps Standing Curl
Standing Preacher Curl**
Reverse-Grip Curl
4
4
3
15, 12, 10, 10
12, 10, 10, 8
12, 10, 10
Chest Wrist Curl
Reverse-Wrist Curl
3
3
15, 15, 15
12, 12, 12
* Have a spotter on hand for this exercise; if you don’t have one, skip it and double up on your lying triceps extensions instead.** Adjust the bench into incline position and stand behind it, placing your upper arms on the pad.